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World | Oct 3, 2022

Far-off galaxy takes on new appearance thanks to James Webb Space Telescope

/ Our Today

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A beautiful spiral galaxy located 29 million light-years from Earth has taken on a new appearance thanks to being pictured in “unprecedented detail” by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. This image of the spiral galaxy IC 5332, taken by the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope with its MIRI instrument, has been scaled and cropped to match the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s view of the same galaxy.

The James Webb Space Telescope helps us see the universe in a new light.

A beautiful spiral galaxy located 29 million light years from Earth has taken on a new appearance thanks to being pictured in “unprecedented detail” by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.

The so-called “bones” of the galaxy are seen for the first time in all their glory. It is named IC 5332 and is 66,000 light years wide, making it about one-third the size of our own Milky Way.

WEBB TELESCOPE USED ITS MID-INFRARED INSTRUMENT, OR MIRI

IC 5332 is notable for being almost perfectly face-on with respect to Earth, allowing us to admire the symmetrical sweep of its spiral arms. To capture the extraordinary image, the Webb telescope used its Mid-InfraRed Instrument, or MIRI.

It is the only Webb instrument that is sensitive to light on mid-infrared wavelengths and can only be observed by telescopes outside of Earth’s atmosphere.

Another picture shows how the Hubble Space Telescope previously observed the galaxy in ultraviolet and visible light.

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