Life
JM | May 24, 2022

NCB Foundation gifts digital spaces to three special needs schools

/ Our Today

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Over 100 volunteers show up islandwide 

From left: Marlene Malahoo Forte, member of parliament for St James West Central; Rhonda Hamilton-Davis, principal of the Caribbean Christian Centre for the Deaf; Major Smith, and Joan Graveney-Grizzle, NCB’s Fairview Financial Centre service quality manager, cast their strokes of paint on the newly created NCB Foundation’s Digital Space.

As Jamaicans ventured out for National Labour Day 2022 (May 23), the NCB Foundation focused on digitally enabling three organisations serving the special needs communities. 

In line with the national Labour Day theme, ‘Reigniting A Nation For Greatness’, more than 100 National Commercial Bank Jamaica Limited (NCBJ) staff and directors, NCBF and partner volunteers visited Lister Mair/Gilby High School for the Deaf, Woodlawn School of Special Education and Caribbean Christian Centre for the Deaf.  

Each school received digital devices including desktops; specialised software; learning aid and murals designed specifically around digital learning. 

“Choosing to labour at these three organisations furthers the digital inclusion and participation for persons with disabilities,” said Nadeen Matthews Blair, CEO of the NCB Foundation.

“Creating the digital spaces will enhance the learning experiences of the students and wards in alignment with the Foundation’s new focus on digital education to equip Jamaicans with globally relevant and in-demand digital skills.” 

“In keeping with the tenets of our purpose to empower people and build communities, we believe this donation of digital assets and volunteering at the schools is contributing to nation building.”

Nadeen Matthews Blair, CEO of the NCB Foundation

Decked in yellow, the 50 members of the Surrey team arrived mid-morning at the flagship project in Papine, the Lister Mair/Gilby High School for the Deaf, one of NCBJ’s 43 adopted schools. 

Lister Mair/Gilby High is a public, secondary school, and sixth form in Hope Estate, Papine was established in 1966. It provides special education to deaf and or hard-of-hearing students, aged 12 to 21 years, in a variety of subject areas.  

“In keeping with the tenets of our purpose to empower people and build communities, we believe this donation of digital assets and volunteering at the schools is contributing to nation building,” Matthews Blair shared

Work Preparation

For the principal of Caribbean Christian Centre for the Deaf, Rhonda Hamilton-Davis, the donation will go a long way in preparing the students.

NCB Foundation CEO Nadeen Matthews Blair chats with Stacy-Ann Dockery (left), principal of the Lister Mair/Gilby High School for the Deaf at the Surrey project.

“The aim of the school is to prepare the students for the world of work. I am grateful to the NCB Foundation for including them in this Labour Day project and providing the students with the resources they need. Many people are afraid to employ someone who is deaf, but once they are competent, they should be able to get the job,” Hamilton-Davis explained.

At her school, the Cornwall team of 25 were led by the NCBJ Montego Bay Financial Centre service quality manager Joan Graveney-Grizzle. 

Woodlawn School of Special Education in Middlesex, established in 1956, is the largest and oldest school serving children with intellectual disabilities in Jamaica and the English-speaking Caribbean also has a team of 25 volunteers led by Lloyd Richardson head of the Mandeville Financial Centre.   

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